GENESIS THE SECOND

31 Dec

GENESIS THE SECOND

space photo:  IMG_8904.jpgOh the complexity of the Universe!

As one star burns itself out another one is born until there are no more births and only deaths, and then nothing.

Except a Power.

And, suddenly, a flimsy remnant of Janie Cobweb, a wisp of thought, an atom’s breadth of consciousness, the least murmur in a vacuum. That was there. Somewhere like the fading echo of a papal sermon might be somewhere. Insubstantial, without form, and in a void.

And of all possible coincidences it nudged against a Power. The Power. The most ancient of all Powers. From before the beginning it had rested, had nurtured this and that, had overseen almost nothing, had sniggered at a nemesis that hadn’t really existed, had threatened to gather souls to it, then sniggered again at the joke. It was fun being a Power and taken for granted before being turned into a comic-strip deity. Though that might be considered a bit of an insult!

And here was a proper nemesis.

Janie Cobweb!

“Welcome to my heaven,” it rumbled at the wisp of her.

“Bollocks!” she hissed back, somehow. “There’s no Heaven! Nowhere! How can there be?”

“There’s me.” The Power yawned, already bored at the mundanity of the conversation. It despised mundanity – and why shouldn’t it? To be mundane was to be almost totally boring, and the Power was never that. It had interests, gigantic, omniscient and omnipotent interests, and they kept its attention as epochs came and went.

“And you are?” projected the remnant of Janie Cobweb.

“Call me what you want. See if I care! They once called me Creator until they saw sense and called me God – and I was neither of those. I toy with things, never build, never destroy, never interfere. They had me being a serpent once – idiots the lot of them, and so short lived I hadn’t the time to tell them…”

“So what shall I call you?” asked Janie Cobweb, curious and gaining strength from nowhere.

The Power sniggered, a long affair that rumbled around the emptiness of a dead Universe. And sniggers take time. They roll hither and thither, they absorb what isn’t there, they fill hearts with dread and delight. If there are hearts to fill, that is. And there weren’t, though the dread and delight persisted.

“You know what to call me,” breathed the Power, and for a fractured second Janie Cobweb could smell its breath. Lilac? Roses on a summer’s day in a long-vanished England? New mown hay? The merest hint of smoke in ancient air? Wood smoke.

“You know what it is?” giggled the Power. “The petals and the fire?”

“I was a baby,” thought Janie Cobweb. “New born that day, and they took my mother, and burned her like kindling, bound to a stake and weeping…”

“Join with me,” sighed the Power. “You know what I am … but who am I?”

“We,” whispered the remnant, “You are … we!”

“More haste, less speed!” clucked the Power. “First, think of what you’re doing! Haven’t you had enough? Haven’t you seen enough? Been evil enough? Just slow down, young woman, slow down!”

But Janie Cobweb, or the wispy fleeting fragment of her, had a new determination. She/it/they smelled power. She nudged the Power and like a sperm entering an egg she merged with it. One fragment with another, maybe, or, indeed, a sperm and an egg.

And in the darkness she was blind.

“I am you,” she told the Power. “We are me, and things are going to change!”

“So you know what comes next?” it giggled.

“I do.”

“Then so be it.”

“Let there be Light!” commanded Janie Cobweb.

© Peter Rogerson 31.12.14

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6 Responses to “GENESIS THE SECOND”

  1. pambrittain January 4, 2015 at 8:13 pm #

    Of course.

  2. georgiakevin April 6, 2015 at 12:48 am #

    The thing is your work is so deep that your reader really has to read each post over and over again because for each read you see something different.

    • Peter Rogerson April 6, 2015 at 8:50 am #

      Although I don’t like planning or writing slowly, I do like to think I put some thought into stuff.

      • georgiakevin April 6, 2015 at 1:02 pm #

        Ypu always do my friend you always do.

  3. Peter Rogerson April 6, 2015 at 1:20 pm #

    Thanks, Kevin.

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